Writing Prompt: Tablespoon / Misapplication / Projectile

Mr. Alonza lifted open his eyes after a recreational night of imbibing, the assortment of black lashes fluttering over his pupils.

A tablespoon of apple cider vinegar pierced through his veins like the sporadic memories from the previous evening clouding his conscious with self-doubt and regret: an awkward and unsuccessful courtship attempt when Tonya Herlowitz out to dinner and a movie, reaching unwanted paws into an opaque bin of orange slices multiple times along the bar rail or darting across an intersection without his party.

The obligatory misapplication of hangover cures follows out of desperation, all in the name of avoiding a projectile encounter.

Studying with the Stars

 

Dr. Greg Mosby-page-001

Dr. Gregory Mosby delves into astronomy’s most pressing questions.

The lead author of five abstracts found in the Space Astrophysics/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS). A contributor to seven other projects, including the Robert Stobie Spectrograph-Near Infrared (RSS-NIR) of the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). An EAGLE Middle School Science Mentor Program Astronomy Mentor as well as an RSS-NIR Lab Undergraduate Mentor and Advisor.

Similar to the nebulae he studies, Dr. Gregory Mosby has derived into a gleaming and multi-faceted entity that stands out in a crowded field. He accomplished so much as a UW-Madison graduate student in the Department of Astronomy while examining galaxy evolution, star formation and stellar population analysis. Yet he still has a lot to work toward as a NASA Goddard Space Center Postdoctoral Fellow.

After earning a Bachelor of Science in Astronomy and Physics from Yale University in 2009, Dr. Mosby was not sure where he would pursue his postgraduate endeavors. Which variables factored into his decision?

“I was choosing between two schools (the University of Florida and the University of Wisconsin-Madison),” Dr. Mosby said. “On top of being the better department atmosphere match, the additional funding was a very nice incentive to choose UW-Madison.”

Dr. Mosby utilized UW-Madison’s Advanced Opportunity Funding [AOF] Fellowships for pre-dissertator status and for dissertators to finance his intellectual ambitions.

“I also believe the community support that came with the AOF the first year was crucial in helping me adjust to a new place, network, and get plugged into resources.”

Dr. Mosby collaborated with Drs. Andrew Sheinis, Marsha Wolf and Eric Hooper as advisors to obtain a Master of Science in Astronomy.

“My research focuses enabling observations to test our current models for how galaxies evolve,” Dr. Mosby said. “Strong relationships between the black holes in the centers of galaxies and global galaxy properties suggest that galaxies and their black holes might have ‘grown’ together.”

As he sought his Doctor of Philosophy in Astronomy, Dr. Mosby combined with Drs. Christy Tremonti, Wolf and Hooper as advisors to define his passion for uncovering how star systems mature.

“By looking at the star formation histories of galaxies with black holes actively growing now, we can try to assess to what extent this is the case. My research has focused on improving the techniques we use to measure star formation histories of these galaxies with active black holes.”

As part of the NASA Postdoctoral Program, Dr. Mosby is now teaming with advisor Dr. Bernard Rauscher to assemble a research proposal titled Laying the Foundation to Find Life with HgCdTe Detectors.

Without the backing he received at UW-Madison, Dr. Mosby’s probe into galaxy research would not be shining as bright as it is today.

“I want thank each and every donor for their support of the UW-Madison Graduate School,” Dr. Mosby said. “It really means a lot and can change the trajectory of student careers. Once the barrier of funding is eliminated, the real work can begin.”

Visit grad.wisc.edu or contact the Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Funding for more information.

Wisconsin School of Business Student Spotlight Revisions

This is not an official University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Business publication and is only intended to serve as a display of my writing ability.

“STUDENT SPOTLIGHT” INTRODUCTIONS — Mike DeVine
Wisconsin School of Business

MBA Graduation Year: 2019 (3)

Erik Aellig
Erik is looking to advance in his company and obtain credentials for a high-level job abroad in the future. After one semester, he’s received a new job offer within his company and has improved his organizational and leadership skills.

Ashley Blinka
Four years into her current role, Ashley discovered that she was most passionate when she could develop talent and affect strategies and processes. At UW-Madison, she is honing her management skills and gaining new insights to improve her business ingenuity.

Tom Lea
A lifetime Badger relatively new to business, Tom knew he needed fresh skills to advance his career. Meeting likeminded professionals, finding a surprise passion in financial accounting, and gaining confidence in his business acumen helped him expand his influence.

MBA Graduation Year: 2018 (7)

Kim Bruksch
Armed with confidence after launching a major initiative in her previous position, Kim came to Wisconsin to cultivate her leadership prowess and develop the business skills she needs to make a greater impact in her company and community.

Julia Fillingame
Julia returned to Madison after extensive experience abroad to earn her MBA and advance her career. Specializing in nonprofits, microenterprises, and artisan cooperatives, she is building her leadership skills so she can become a more effective manager.

Jordan Lee
After 10 years in hospitality management, Jordan looked to advance beyond the limitations of her supervisory role. She has already taken a big step toward her management goal by assuming a new role with a state business development program.

Lauren Pedracine
Lauren has made two major career moves at Kohl’s since coming to Wisconsin. She was promoted from purchasing agent to senior purchasing agent before moving into marketing for her current Loyalty Coordinator position.

Jim Schadeberg
With a Bachelor of Business Education and experience as a financial analyst for Covance, Jim’s passion is evident. He is looking to diversify his skill set and equip himself to run his own company one day.

Ashley Sliter
Ashley improved her career soon after beginning the program at Wisconsin. She secured a new position during her first semester and continues to gain the necessary skills and experience to take her career to the next level.

Michael Zeamer
Michael wanted a broader perspective to expand his career options beyond his highly focused engineering background. He is receiving a broad-based business education at Wisconsin featuring collaborative learning, career planning, and networking that will help him advance.

MBA Graduation Year: 2017 (4)

Ali Baumgartner
After completing her undergraduate internship at Fiskars, Ali graduated and went on to work for the company. Just a couple years—and a promotion—later, Ali knew she didn’t want to wait to take her career to the next level.

Sam Harvey
Sam needed business knowledge to move into a new role after came from a non-business background. An industrial engineer with operations experience, he has already been promoted, moved into product management and started his own business since enrolling at Wisconsin.

Heather Kopec
Though she has undergraduate degrees in Art and Spanish, Heather wanted to open herself up to even more future opportunities. She knew she had the creative and communication skills to succeed, but wanted an increased focus on strategy and analysis.

Matthew Teresinski
Matthew earned a Bronze Star during seven years in the U.S. Army before moving to the next step of his life. He chose Wisconsin because the skills and network opportunities gained will take his career to the next level.

MBA Graduation Year: 2015 (2)

Ryan Derus
Starting as a laboratory technologist in healthcare, Ryan wanted to move into business strategy. He chose Wisconsin because he would be equipped with the versatile business skills he needed to switch careers and advance to a higher level.

Donovan Malloy
Donovan began his career in a human resources developmental program where he found he learned best by working with others to solve critical challenges. At his alma mater, he is elevating his reasoning and preparing to solve new challenges.

The Human Touch: Levin Warns that Technology May be Draining Health Care Empathy

This is not an official University of Utah Health Sciences publication and is only intended to serve as a display of my writing ability.

Fifty-six percent of all Americans own a smart phone. The term nomophobia has been coined and accepted into our lexicon to describe the fear and rush of anxiety that may accompany some when being without their phone. Computer users report an average of 66 hours per week staring at their monitor. One in eight people are addicted to the internet.

Since the advent of iPhones and MacBooks, people have grown tethered to their smart phone screens and laptop monitors, while at the same time human affection and connection has decreased in all walks of life. The health care profession is no different.

“[The thing that health care needs to change the most] is the understanding of the significance of the loss of compassion and empathy in the entire spectrum of health enterprises,” said President and CEO of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Richard Levin.

The clinician-patient must be maximized to enhance the hospital visit experience to its fullest potential.

“In every health encounter—institutional, ambulatory care, it doesn’t matter,” Levin said. “The availability of technologies that actually make a difference over the course of an illness, and the acceptance by clinicians of the need to be efficient, to follow the value equation—which is value equals quality over dollars—has caused us to lose sight of the fact that this began and must remain a human interaction between clinician and patient.”

Levin believes two factors, keeping the importance technology in perspective and responsibility of hospital leadership, can ensure that human interaction remains paramount in health care.

 Deemphasizing Technology in the Patient Experience

The prominence of technology in protocol and procedures has increased since 1819, while the importance of human contact has been on the decline.

“Technology is actually neutral,” Levin said. “It’s neither a good nor bad thing. It’s how it’s used, and whether we’re aware of its potential to move us way from the critical challenge, which is to reestablish contact. We began to lose it curiously, paradoxically with [René] Laennec’s invention of the stethoscope.”

Physician visits were a much more intimate experience.

“In order to listen to the wheezing of a person with asthma or the burbling of someone with pneumonia, you had to put your ear on the patient’s chest,” Levin said. “With the invention of the stethoscope, which amplified the sound, it moved the doctor away from the patient physically. In many ways, we’ve been on that pathway now for over 200 years.”

Levin’s aim is to arm medical students with a well-rounded knowledge and comprehension of humanity early in their educational track in lieu of guidance on how to use the latest gadgets.

“We need to change the nature of health professions education so that the conversations about these very difficult, complex, basic problems in human existence can be understood before our students hit the first wall of transition, which is from studying biology to taking a pulse, meeting a patient, being in the hurly-burly world of the academic medical center,” Levin said.

“And [we need] to get the student involved to understand how strong the pull will be of what academics refer to as the hidden curriculum, the curriculum that is the process of being socialized into becoming a practicing physician.”

Influencing Leadership

It starts at the top. Levin believes an open dialogue with thought leaders across the industry regarding the increase of human compassion in hospitals and research institutions is a necessary component of the development of the health care system.

“And the second thing is an understanding by the top of the chain in what have become hospital city-states—remarkable organizations that have extraordinary power in local or huge geographies,” Levin said. “There must be a recognition that in that value equation is this fundamental human value that will in fact result, not only in a better bottom line, but in the salvation of health care in the United States. And encouraging the conversation will allow us to move back to the future.”

Levin predicts that backtracking to a more human-oriented emphasis during treatment will be essential.

“The concern is that we have allowed a system to develop– and that’s an active thing we did—which seems to fail to recognize the value of this most fundamental of the core elements of scientifically excellent practice,” Levin said. “I think it will be fine, but we do need to go through this process of recovery.”

Overall, Levin has mixed views of the future of health care.

“I’m hopeful and frightened,” Levin said. “I’m hopeful because touring around the entire country, interviewing medical students about this perspective humanism and medicine, they are as good, as turned on, as engaged, as hopeful, as any group of medical students in my lifetime. So that’s fantastic. If anything, the system is encouraging a group of people who could be humanist in practice.

Ultimately, patients need to feel that they’re in a safe harbor in order to be completely open, to be truthful, to be intimate, to be accepted by another human being whose sole purpose in being there is taking care of that individual. Research has shown that compassionate care improves health outcomes.”

If the health care field is able to revert back to an emphasis on human connection that was prevalent before Laennec’s invention of the stethoscope, physicians will be listening in to much more fulfilled hearts.

 

 

 

Wisconsin School of Business Student Spotlight Introduction Revisions

This is not an official University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Business publication and is only intended to serve as an exhibition of my writing ability.

“STUDENT SPOTLIGHT” INTRODUCTIONS — Mike DeVine
Wisconsin School of Business

MBA Graduation Year: 2019 (3)

Erik Aellig
Erik is looking to advance in his company and obtain credentials for a high-level job abroad in the future. After one semester, he’s received a new job offer within his company and has improved his organizational and leadership skills.

Ashley Blinka
Four years into her current role, Ashley discovered that she was most passionate when she could develop talent and affect strategies and processes. At UW-Madison, she is honing her management skills and gaining new insights to improve her business ingenuity.

Tom Lea
A lifetime Badger relatively new to business, Tom knew he needed fresh skills to advance his career. Meeting likeminded professionals, finding a surprise passion in financial accounting, and gaining confidence in his business acumen helped him expand his influence.

MBA Graduation Year: 2018 (7)

Kim Bruksch
Armed with confidence after launching a major initiative in her previous position, Kim came to Wisconsin to cultivate her leadership prowess and develop the business skills she needs to make a greater impact in her company and community.

Julia Fillingame
Julia returned to Madison after extensive experience abroad to earn her MBA and advance her career. Specializing in nonprofits, microenterprises, and artisan cooperatives, she is building her leadership skills so she can become a more effective manager.

Jordan Lee
After 10 years in hospitality management, Jordan looked to advance beyond the limitations of her supervisory role. She has already taken a big step toward her management goal by assuming a new role with a state business development program.

Lauren Pedracine
Lauren has made two major career moves at Kohl’s since coming to Wisconsin. She was promoted from purchasing agent to senior purchasing agent before moving into marketing for her current Loyalty Coordinator position.

Jim Schadeberg
With a Bachelor of Business Education and experience as a financial analyst for Covance, Jim’s passion is evident. He is looking to diversify his skill set and equip himself to run his own company one day.

Ashley Sliter
Ashley improved her career soon after beginning the program at Wisconsin. She secured a new position during her first semester and continues to gain the necessary skills and experience to take her career to the next level.

Michael Zeamer
Michael wanted a broader perspective to expand his career options beyond his highly focused engineering background. He is receiving a broad-based business education at Wisconsin featuring collaborative learning, career planning, and networking that will help him advance.

MBA Graduation Year: 2017 (4)

Ali Baumgartner
After completing her undergraduate internship at Fiskars, Ali graduated and went on to work for the company. Just a couple years—and a promotion—later, Ali knew she didn’t want to wait to take her career to the next level.

Sam Harvey
Sam needed business knowledge to move into a new role after came from a non-business background. An industrial engineer with operations experience, he has already been promoted, moved into product management and started his own business since enrolling at Wisconsin.

Heather Kopec
Though she has undergraduate degrees in Art and Spanish, Heather wanted to open herself up to even more future opportunities. She knew she had the creative and communication skills to succeed, but wanted an increased focus on strategy and analysis.

Matthew Teresinski
Matthew earned a Bronze Star during seven years in the U.S. Army before moving to the next step of his life. He chose Wisconsin because the skills and network opportunities gained will take his career to the next level.

MBA Graduation Year: 2015 (2)

Ryan Derus
Starting as a laboratory technologist in healthcare, Ryan wanted to move into business strategy. He chose Wisconsin because he would be equipped with the versatile business skills he needed to switch careers and advance to a higher level.

Donovan Malloy
Donovan began his career in a human resources developmental program where he found he learned best by working with others to solve critical challenges. At his alma mater, he is elevating his reasoning and preparing to solve new challenges.

All In for Diversity: A Call to Action for U of U Health Sciences Departments

This is not an official University of Utah/a> Health Sciences publication and is only intended to serve as a display of my writing ability.

“It takes a village …” is as cliché as it gets in today’s culture.

Yet to thrive in the ever-changing multicultural climate of health care education, the communal value encrypted in this classic idiom remains a necessary factor in the equation of success for University of Utah Health Sciences.

“Something we’re actively working on is really creating an environment that promotes inclusive excellence across the health sciences,” said Associate vice president for Health Equity and Inclusion at University of Utah Health Sciences Ana Maria Lopez, M.D., M.P.H.

“And it’s really thinking that, you know, we are facing complex problems in health care, and to face and address complex problems we need everybody’s voice.”

A two-sided course of action has been cultivated by Lopez to construct an ecosystem of inclusion among the five schools and colleges of University of Utah Health Sciences, aiming to inform and involve the more than 14,000 faculty and staff.

Inform

Lopez believes a world-class healthcare education institution must feature a wide variety of resources to pool from and she has recently arranged for different speakers to visit campus to illustrate her directive.

“We’re a learning community and during the past few months we’ve had the opportunity to learn,” Lopez said.

“We’ve had visitors come and share their experiences. [The author of The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and Societies] Scott E. Page gave such a wonderful talk where he talked about if you want to be a B institution then you have a homogenous environment. If you want to be A+ you want to have a heterogeneous diverse environment.”

After a series of speakers like Page visit campus, empirical data will be collected and scrutinized to gauge the progress that has been made.

“So I think as speakers come and as we learn, we start to move the needle forward in all of the different constituencies so that we can begin to test,” Lopez said.

Assessments will then be made centered around interviews of select personnel.

“It really is an evidence-based science so there are best practices,” Lopez said. “Then there are experiments that we can do, perhaps in reviewing candidates to blind, gender, race, ethnicity, and look and see what kind of selections are made when we’re blinded. So to really address unconscious bias in a serious way may be one experiment that could be done.”

Involve

Before achieving her grand objective, Lopez also knows it will take a personal touch to lay the groundwork for an ideal campus climate.

“I’m early in the process, and I’m really trying to engage as many folks as possible,” Lopez said. “I am limited by the fact that there are so many waking hours, and the campus and the number of people, it’s a lot. But yeah, so I wish I could do that more quickly, but I do think that that step-by-step meeting folks and engaging people at the one-on-one level is important.”

No one person can be counted on to inspire increases in inclusion, but Lopez has assumed the charge of acting as a catalyst for change by building personal connections with thought leaders across campus.

“The first thing has been to really engage more folks around this, so they’re representatives from each school, from each college, each program,” Lopez said. “Then there are partners that we need to really help work so that everybody feels that inclusive excellence is part of what they need to do.”

A communal approach must be shared among the different departments.

“Right, and really so that everybody feels it’s their responsibility,” Lopez said. “The faculty in medicine, the faculty in psychiatry, they all have specific goals for their faculty, so what’s great for me is to be able to work as a resource, provide best practices, and then have the departments set the path out for themselves.”

The principal goal of Lopez’s personal connections will be to accountability and influence of individuals throughout University of Utah Health Sciences’ colleges and schools.

“Some people might say, “Well, we have to attract people from the outside, growing your own takes time,” all of these are true but we’re in it for the long term,” Lopez said. “We know that in order to care for our patients we want to be more reflective of the population. The University of Utah is so committed to quality and excellence. In order to do that, we need to address inclusive excellence from all ends.”

But after the significant investment of resources and time required to carry out these plans, Lopez believes Utah Health Sciences will improve its influence on the health and well-being of Utah residents.

“I think that the impact would really be seen in moving the institution forward from a quality and an excellence perspective so that we will really be better than we were.”

The University of Utah “village” will reap the benefits for the foreseeable future.

download

People forget … about #mentalhealth

Sending positive energy, ju-ju, prayers, karma, thoughts and whatever else I can muster out to everyone in Vegas. #prayforvegas

Though I clearly have no idea about the motive(s) of the Vegas events, I want to take time to get on my soap box from some #realtalk

Rightfully so, #guncontrol is the hot button issue that most will beeline toward. But please don’t neglect #mentalhealth.

I have seen a therapist for at least five years to treat anxiety, social anxiety, depression, etc. And I will continue to do so. #mentalhealth

Life throws a lot at you so there’s no room to be embarrassed or worried about people thinking you’re a weirdo or weak. #mentalhealth

Now back to your regularly scheduled programming …

untitled-4

Midwest Appeal NCAA FBS — Week 2

For Week 2 of the Midwest Appeal NCAA FBS, we have five inter-region matchups marked in red …

Sept. 9 Akron Zips Arkansas-Pine Bluff Golden Lions
Ball State Cardinals UAB Blazers
Bowling Green Falcons South Dakota Coyotes
Eastern Michigan Eagles at Rutgers Scarlet Knights
Illinois Fighting Illini Western Kentucky Hilltoppers
Indiana Hoosiers at Virginia Cavaliers
Iowa State Cyclones Iowa Hawkeyes
  Kansas Jayhawks Central Michigan Chippewas
No. 19/19 Kansas State Wildcats Charlotte 49ers
Kent State Golden Flashes Howard Bison
Miami Ohio Redhawks Austin Peay Governors
No. 8/8 Michigan Wolverines Cincinnati Bearcats
Michigan State Spartans Western Michigan Broncos
Minnesota Golden Gophers at Oregon State Beavers
Missouri Tigers South Carolina Gamecocks
Nebraska Cornhuskers at Oregon Ducks
Northern Illinois Huskies Eastern Illinois Panthers
Northwestern Wildcats at Duke Blue Devils
No. 24/25 Notre Dame Fighting Irish No. 15/15 Georgia Bulldogs
No. 2/2 Ohio State Buckeyes No. 5/6 Oklahoma Sooners
Toledo Rockets at Nevada Wolf Pack
No. 9/11 Wisconsin Badgers Florida Atlantic Owls